Tag Archives: recruiter

Working with a Recruiter: A Checklist for Candidates

Recruiters are ten a penny but quality recruiters are hard to find so before you entertain a call from a recruiter proposing a life changing career opportunity, it’s worth posing some of the following questions to make sure you are talking to the right individual who you feel comfortable working with.

Find out about their work: Find out about the company they work for i.e. what is the company’s track record, especially in relation to the opportunity they have approached you for. Also delve deeper into their relationship with their clients i.e. in what capacity are they representing their client and/or how long have they been working with their client.

Are there any other candidates in the process? Most recruiters won’t tell how many other candidates are being considered for the role but some do. Also try asking how urgently the role needs to be filled. If they respond with unclear answers, it’s probably because the role has just gone live or is difficult to fill.

What is the opportunity? Don’t be tempted by the job title alone but find out about the nature of work the successful candidate will be doing, about the reporting lines and level of seniority. Insist on receiving a job specification via email from the recruiter. Get as much information on the role as possible.

What is the salary? Instead of asking what the salary is, ask what is the ‘achievable’ salary? Don’t waste time on discussing salary in detail and cut straight to the chase by indicating to the recruiter what level of salary you currently get. The recruiter will then be in a better position to tell you whether or not the salary will be in line with your expectations.

What is their background? This may be an awkward question to ask directly but if you want the recruiter to help you land your dream job you need to know what the credentials of this person are. 9 times out of 10, recruiters will be on LinkedIn so this should be your first port of call when carrying out your due diligence.

What is the average feedback time? One of the major frustrations of both candidates and recruiters is the amount of time it takes to find out about the outcome of an application which unfortunately neither can do much about as it is controlled by the client. Nevertheless, ask the recruiter if there is an average feedback time or if there are going to be any delays in getting feedback.

What is the interview process? Most good recruiters will tell you this automatically but if they don’t, then ask them to break down the interview process step by step i.e. how many stages to the interview, what is the nature of the interview – telephone or face to face or both, who are the interviewers, where and when will the interview take place etc.

Why is the role available? This question should probably be asked in tandem with ‘what is the opportunity?’ Find out if it is a new role or a replacement. If it is a replacement, then ask why that is the case. If you don’t get a clear cut answer here, it might indicate that the client has some deeper employee engagement issue(s) that resulted in the role becoming available.

In summary, a good recruiter will know their client’s requirements inside out. Even if the role they are speaking to you about does not materialise with an offer, do make a point of keeping in touch with them. You never know there might be an even better opportunity for you later on.

 

Advertisements

7 Bizarre Behaviours Demonstrated by Candidates in the Interview Process

From crazy interview questions at Google to nerve shredding interviews on the BBC’s Apprentice, the interview process is a tense and daunting experience. Whilst it is rare that candidates will be subjected to this level of scrutiny, what is certain is that interviews can either bring out the very best or worst in candidates. Here are seven bizarre behaviours demonstrated by candidates before, during and after the interview process.

Candidate is asked about motivations

Interviewer: So what got you interested in this position?

Candidate: My parents told me to apply!

The outcome of this interview was not favourable. Despite the candidate ticking all the boxes on paper, the interviewer stated that this single response resulted in the candidate being rejected. Ill thought out answers are a sure fire to destroy interview success.

Turning up at the interview at the wrong time

In this example, a candidate turned up at his interview at BST (British Standard Time) when he was supposed to turn up at the interview at CET (Central European Time). The Hiring Manager wasn’t too happy about this and waited for the candidate for around 30 minutes. It wasn’t until the recruiter contacted the candidate on his mobile that it emerged that the candidate thought the interview was BST when in the confirmation email it was stated that the interview was CET. When arranging interviews between client and candidates overseas, communication is absolutely essential. It’s always good to double check and if one is really pedantic, triple check.

Telling a Hiring Manager during a telephone interview they are not really interested in the job

In this example, the candidate had a full, transparent discussion with the head-hunter and his motivations and aspirations were ascertained. When it came to the telephone interview, the candidate told the Hiring Manager that they were not really interested in the job but wanted to have a general discussion. So as a head-hunter when asking a candidate about their interest in a particular job, it is a good idea to ask them a questions along the lines of “on a scale of 1 to 10, how interested are you in this job” or “what is your level of interest going to be in a few weeks time”. That will allow a better understanding of their exact level of interest.

No contact after interview

In this example, the candidate interviewed with the client with positive feedback with the client inviting the candidate for a second (face to face) stage interview. The recruiter contacted the candidate to make the necessary arrangements but despite repeated attempts is unable to get hold of the candidate via mobile email, text. Result = radio silence and even more strange was that this particular candidate was still active on a social media site.

Candidate attending another call at the same time of telephone interview

Whilst it is understandable that unforeseen circumstances might prevent communication between the client and candidate, it is absolutely essential that all other calls are put on hold. The client has blocked out time to interview so common courtesy should be extended.

Not being in a quite place during a telephone interview

One of the golden rules in telephone interviewing is that a candidate must be in nice, quite private place when speaking to a recruiter and/or client. Background noise or a lack of privacy will hamper ability to give solid answers and jeopardise chances of further progression in the interview process.

Failing to disclose information to the recruiter and/or client

One of the pet hates of head – hunters and clients is a candidate failing to update them on issues that may be critical to their candidacy. Common issues include not being transparent about salary expectations, failing to inform of competing offers, interviews with other companies, interview availability. A little foresight will go a long way to avoiding problems further in the process.

 

4 questions you need to ask before contemplating a job move

Thinking - lampelina

The global economic decline has prompted many employees to cling on desperately to their current jobs. But as skills sets become scarcer in certain professions and  sectors, individuals with particular hard to find skills sets are increasingly in demand. Faced with increased probability of getting a call from a head-hunter/recruiter, here are 3 questions you need to ask yourself before considering a potential career move.

  1. Will the opportunity on offer improve my quality of life?
  2. If I chose to stay in my current role, what would the next step for me be with my current employer?
  3. What isn’t working for me in my current role?
  4. Will the proposed role add value to my career in the long run?

Focusing your discussion on the above four questions will ensure that you cover the critical aspects with the head-hunter/recruiter. By doing this, you will keep the conversation flowing and allow yourself to make an informed decision about whether or not to progress discussions to the next level.

Photo credit:   lampelina