Category Archives: Recruiting

Don’t Be a Snob When It Comes to Hiring

The global economic crisis has triggered significant changes in the global labour market. Qualified people find themselves underemployed, mature workers are frozen out, graduates are struggling to get jobs, and disengaged workers are sitting tight in the hope that the market will rebound for them to make a move, and an increasing number of people choosing not to go to college/university .These are just a few of the trends that are reverberating the world over, especially in Western economies. Faced with an acute shortage of quality talent, Hiring Managers should not be too picky when it comes to making hiring decisions and instead think outside the box when sourcing candidates for job openings. Below are talent pools that Hiring Managers should not ignore:

Individuals returning to work: Mothers who have taken time off to have children and want to get back into work have high levels of motivation and desire. If you are willing to spend some time and effort to reintegrate them back into the work routine, they can prove to be useful hires. Similar applies to ill people who have recovered from an illness and want to return to work.

The unemployed:  Many experienced individuals have been frozen out of the market altogether through no fault of their own. This is evident in the banking and financial services sector that was the worst affected at the height of the financial crisis. So don’t make assumptions about the unemployed! You may just be able to unearth a gem.

Army veterans: Ask anybody who has been in recruitment and they will tell you that ex – army personnel make really good hires. They are highly disciplined, professional and can possess a wide skills set. If you are a small to medium sized business in particular, this talent pool can add significant value to your company.

The under qualified: Last year French engineering giant ALSTOM announced that they welcome applications from individuals who are only a 70% fit for the job. The company stated that it would pay for engineers to train up to a certain level – this is a game changer and an innovative solution to tackling skills shortages within the engineering sector. So next time you receive an application from someone working at McDonalds, don’t be quick to dismiss them as unsuitable. Successful and thriving companies develop and nurture talent.

Overseas candidates: Tight immigration rules in Western economies mean that companies will find it harder to attract quality talent. Multinationals such as Infosys have expressed concern that they will not be able to hire the quality talent they need for the UK. Draconian and restrictive employment practices have also rendered professionals such as doctors, lawyers, engineers from overseas doing menial jobs in the UK. If nothing is done to challenge these policies and practices, then Western companies will continue to suffer skills shortages.

The over – 50s: It is a widely accepted misconception that if you are over 50, you are on the scrap heap. As a result of this many companies turn a blind eye to CVs. A disconnect with reality prevails as companies are failing to understand that due economic pressures and the pensions crisis, the modern workforce will get greyer and older. Research has shown that over – 50s have higher levels of engagement and have a stronger appetite for work.

There will continue to be significant challenges to sourcing talent if certain attitudes do not change. Innovative thinking is required if the Hiring Managers really want to tackle the skills shortages.

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4 questions you need to ask before contemplating a job move

Thinking - lampelina

The global economic decline has prompted many employees to cling on desperately to their current jobs. But as skills sets become scarcer in certain professions and  sectors, individuals with particular hard to find skills sets are increasingly in demand. Faced with increased probability of getting a call from a head-hunter/recruiter, here are 3 questions you need to ask yourself before considering a potential career move.

  1. Will the opportunity on offer improve my quality of life?
  2. If I chose to stay in my current role, what would the next step for me be with my current employer?
  3. What isn’t working for me in my current role?
  4. Will the proposed role add value to my career in the long run?

Focusing your discussion on the above four questions will ensure that you cover the critical aspects with the head-hunter/recruiter. By doing this, you will keep the conversation flowing and allow yourself to make an informed decision about whether or not to progress discussions to the next level.

Photo credit:   lampelina

 

Answer the phone – your next job may just be a phone call away

Mobile phone biz man

Searching for a job isn’t fun, and if there is anybody out there who found it enjoyable, I would be most interested to hear from them. For most people, it is a stressful, time consuming and grueling experience. The global recession has only made it more difficult than ever before to look for a job with the average job search now taking 8 months, and even more depending on the type of industry.

The main challenge for all modern companies isn’t to find talent but to find the right quality of talent which is becoming harder to find.  An ageing workforce and lesser quality fresh talent coming off the conveyor belt is making recruitment and retention a number 1 challenge for companies. We are now entering a whole new age of employee engagement and retention where companies need to be on the front foot in the identification, development and retention of quality talent.

This challenge is now forcing many companies to become more innovative with their recruiting methods. Some companies have totally embraced social media and incorporated it into their recruiting apparatus, whilst others remain more loyal to traditional forms of recruiting via advertising in newspapers, job boards etc. Increasingly, many companies employ the services of a headhunter to help them find and attract talent. As we progress in this information age, technology is going to play an even greater role. As individuals we are going to be better connected with each other, and that means we will be more visible to the outside world. So if your name exists anywhere in print or online, the chances are you are likely to get an email or a call from a headhunter.

So if they called you, why should you entertain their call? First, they have probably contacted you about a job that isn’t advertised anywhere publicly. Headhunters have access to the ‘hidden job market’ so if they called you it’s because they think you might be suitable for a new challenge. Second, even if you do not display a genuine interest in what they want to talk to you about, it’s probably worth keeping in touch with them as you never know what the future holds. A good headhunter will be a very well connected person who could put you in touch with potential future opportunities. So if you have a particular skill set and haven’t had a call from a headhunter, you should expect one in the not too distant future.

Photo credit:  CELALTEBER