10 Insightful Talent & Career Quotes to Inspire & Motivate You

ONE):  “Recently, I was asked if I was going to fire an employee who made a mistake that cost the company $600,000. No, I replied, I just spent $600,000 training him. Why would I want somebody to hire his experience?”- Thomas John Watson Sr., Former chairman and CEO of IBM

TWO):  “Acquiring the right talent is the most important key to growth. Hiring was – and still is – the most important thing we do.”- Marc Bennioff, Founder, Chairman and co-CEO of Salesforce

THREE):  “The secret of my success is that we have gone to exceptional lengths to hire the best people in the world.”- Steve Jobs, Chairman, Former CEO and co-founder of Apple

FOUR):  “If you hire good people, give them good jobs, and pay them good wages, generally something good is going to happen.”- James Sinegal, Co-founder and former CEO of Costco Wholesale Corporation

FIVE): “The competition to hire the best will increase in the years ahead. Companies that give extra flexibility to their employees will have the edge in this area.”- Bill Gates, Founder of Microsoft Corporation

SIX): “Nothing we do is more important than hiring and developing people. At the end of the day, you bet on people, not on strategies.”- Lawrence Bossidy, Former COO of General Electric

SEVEN): “You are not born with a fixed amount of resilience. Like a muscle, you can build it up, draw on it when you need it. In that process you will figure out who you really are — and you just might become the very best version of yourself.” – Sheryl Sandberg

EIGHT): “Change equals self-improvement. Push yourself to places you haven’t been before.”– Pat Summitt

NINE): “Positive thinking can be contagious. Being surrounded by winners helps you develop into a winner.” – Arnold Schwarzenegger

TEN): “We all have self-doubt. You don’t deny it, but you also don’t capitulate to it. You embrace it.” – Kobe Bryant

Image Credit: AlesiaKazantceva

 

Advertisements

Assessing candidate fit – 5 alternatives for assessing a candidate’s suitability

The interview process is getting longer according to a survey by Glassdoor. With employers faced with increasing challenges of filling hard to fill positions, lack of highly skilled candidates and other competing organisations vying for that same quality talent pool, it is prudent to consider introducing alternatives ways of screening and interviewing candidates. Below are five methods that may have a role to play in the process:

Have them interviewed by the core team

Candidates going for interview at Google are screened by several people including the potential line manager, potential colleagues, a hiring committee and the CEO. However, before they even meet these folk, the candidates have to engage with the recruitment team that includes the recruiter, sourcer, coordinator and candidate host (meeter and greeter). One may argue that this will lead to an even lengthier process but there is merit in the method as meeting many individuals gives a more comprehensive view of a candidate’s suitability, and may result in a better quality of hire as well as improving the candidate experience.

Invite them to dinner

One major multinational I know off, invites candidates to dinner a day before their interview. The rationale behind this is that as individuals we are creatures of our own environments, and during work we have a tendency to behave in a certain (controlled) manner than we would if we were at home with family and/or friends. Taking an individual out of their comfort zone will allow you to better establish how they interact in a social setting, gauge their communication skills and style and how well they conduct themselves in general.

Site visit

If a company has projects in multiple locations, take the candidate out of the office and get them to visit the site and site staff. This will give them a preview of what it is like to work on site and also show the candidate the ‘work in progress or finished product and/or project’. It will also show how they interact with staff and give them the opportunity to demonstrate their attitude to work.

Social Media Profile

Find out if your potential candidate is online (on LinkedIn, Twitter etc). Their online presence may highlight their writing skills (if they blog or post regular comments), the type of content they share could indicate that they are switched on and really informed about their industry as they keep up to date with the latest developments.

Find out about who they work with/were mentored by

Focusing on who the candidates reports into and/or who they were mentored by provides a good indicator of the calibre of candidate. If they work with people who have a good reputation in the industry, this will indicate that they are working with strong people and will have probably received good on the job training – a definite plus for the hiring company! It is also worth looking into who their mentors are and/or who were the people who influenced their careers when they started out. A solid mentor may indicate a high performance candidate! Looking into these details will allow one to get a better view of the candidate’s potential suitability

In summary, contemporary screening and interviewing practices need to adapt to the growing recruiting challenges facing companies. There is a clear need to speed up the process but also to simultaneously strengthen it. The objectively ultimately is to assess if the potential candidate can do they job, will they love the job and can the company actually work with the potential incumbent.

Image Credit: cancsajn

Brexit – Unchartered Waters: Quotes devoted to peace, harmony, respect and a progressive future

Our country is currently in the grip of the worst crisis since the Second World War. After deciding to leave the European Union, an institution that the UK joined in 1975 designed to bring countries in Europe closer to foster greater cooperation, enable free trade and unite behind a common identity, the aftermath has revealed deep and some would argue insidious divisions that have shaken the political, social and economic equilibrium of this country.

As we enter unchartered waters ahead, I hope the country can find a way forward with peace, harmony and respect for the betterment of all. Here are some quotes devoted to just that:

“One of the things I learnt when I was negotiating was that until I changed myself I could not change others. – Nelson Mandela, Former South African President (1918 to 2013)

“Challenges make you discover things about yourself that you never really knew. They’re what make the instrument stretch — what make you go beyond the norm.” – Cicely Tyson, American actress

“Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.” – Leo Tolstoy, Writer (1828 – 1910)

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” – Eleanor Roosevelt, 1st chairwoman of the United Nations Human Rights Commission

“For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.” – Nelson Mandela, Former South African President (1918 to 2013)

It”s our duty to look after ourselves and, then, also to look after our neighbours.” – Margaret Thatcher, Former British Prime Minister (1925 to 2013)

“Happiness cannot come from without. It must come from within. It is not what we see and touch or that which others do for us which makes us happy; it is that which we think and feel and do, first for the other fellow and then for ourselves.” – Helen Keller, author, political activist, and lecture (1880 – 1968)

“An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity.” – Martin Luther King Jr., U.S. civil rights leader, (1929 – 1968)

“Moral responsibility is not just a matter of avoiding harm to others; it also means helping people in need.” – Michael Nedelsky, American educator

“When you’re frightened don’t sit still, keep on doing something. The act of doing will give you back your courage.” –  Grace Ogot, author, nurse, journalist, politician and diplomat (1930 – 2015)

Image Credit: Freeimages.com/ColinCochrane

Candidate Experience – The Final Frontier of Effective Recruiting!

The increasing automated nature of corporate recruiting should improve the candidate experience but as numerous commentators in the human resources space have noted, the process is not great and more work needs to be done to make it better. There are many key players in the entire process but most importantly, it is the hiring managers that really drive everything as they ultimately make the hire. The essence of this fractured relationship between corporate recruiting and candidate experience is candidly summarised by a post by editor and consultant Deborah Branscum who remarks that “if hiring managers were doctors, half of new patients would be dead in 18 months.” This is a stark assessment considering we are in fiercely competitive labour market with companies fishing in the same talent pool as every other competitor. Here are some (not all) of the common pains of the candidate experience:

  • Despite ATS’s, candidates are still falling through cracks, and it is taking longer to fill positions
  • Despite the commonly held belief that candidates are flexible on location, they actually want to work somewhere that is within commuting distance of the office
  • Assumptions are made regarding a candidates salary expectations
  • Candidates are passed between pillar and post by different hiring managers – and that is just at the CV review stage!
  • Candidates are not being properly updated on their candidacy
  • Candidates aren’t interviewed in a timely manner
  • Candidates don’t get the feedback they are looking for – responses are not constructive but general
  • Candidate experience doesn’t rank highly on a hiring managers agenda, and is increasingly misunderstood altogether
  • The on boarding experience is falling by the wayside with an increasing number of candidates rejecting offers after they have accepted
  • The automated nature of recruiting results mostly in communication with the candidate via email
  • The employer brand is suffering

The reality is that as technology and trends have changed overtime, behaviours have not. Recruiting is evolving, so should behaviours and with that policies and procedures to reflect the changing nature of the labour market. To get it right, companies need to develop a service orientated mind-set rather than being transactional. Hiring Managers and other key players need to become brand ambassadors for their company and become totally invested in improving candidate experience as they are invested in their day jobs.

Be the Hiring Manager that sets an example

The role of the Hiring Manager is absolutely central to getting the entire process to work properly so the following improvements should be put in place for Hiring Managers:

Holiday handover – When going on holiday, put a handover plan together updating the rest of the team on candidates, delegating responsibility for interviews and offer approvals. Don’t put things on hold when you go on holiday. Recruiting is important business!

Don’t set false expectations – If a candidate was interviewed and you promised to get back to them with feedback within two weeks, do get back to them and don’t forget about them! Treat others as you would like to be treated. Failure to do so is a recipe for disaster, and you run the risk of bringing the employer brand into disrepute.

Interview feedback – When you do get back to the candidate with feedback, be constructive rather than general – give them the good, the bad and the ugly. Regardless if they are successful or not, candidates will really value your insight as it might help them improve their interview performance next time they go for an interview, or might even help them address a weakness that was not apparent to them before. If they are a good candidate for future roles, welcome them to reapply, and keep in touch with them.

Work in partnership – Keep your recruitment department fully updated on candidates in the interview process, work with them on resourcing needs, and be fully aligned with them so they can go to market to deliver the key marketing message(s) of why candidates should join your team.

Interview team – Have an interview tag team in place that can pick up the baton from you if you are going to be out of the office or tied up on a project. Delegate responsibility to them to continue the interview process in your absence, and have pre-agreed interview dates in the diary so that candidates can be interviewed without delay.

Get everybody on the same page – Make sure resourcing needs are filtered down to all levels. Avoid scenarios where conflicts between workload and resourcing needs occur. If you have a hire to make, ask yourself – is there physical desk space available for them, which office will they be based in, what work will they actually be doing, do you actually need to hire in the first place? Addressing these questions will eliminate inefficiency and help to increase speed of hire.

Time management – As Hiring Managers, you do have a day job but you also have responsibility to grow the team and contribute towards profitability so set aside ample time for reviewing candidate applications, providing feedback to candidate, conducting interviews etc.

Improved processes and procedures

A periodic review of the effectiveness of current recruiting processes and procedures will help highlight any deficiencies but to create a recruiting model fit for purpose, the following elements should be considered:

Return to traditional communication – To counter the behaviours triggered by ATS’s, less email more phone should be the order of the day. A personal touch goes a long way to improving the candidate experience.

Be social – An increasing number of candidates are on social media sites such as LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook so a dedicated social media strategy is a must for companies if they want to properly engage with the talent pool and effectively deliver the EVP.  The employer brand will be rendered irrelevant if there is there is a lack of social media presence.

Careers site – Have a dedicated career site candidates can visit to obtain information on the interview process – i.e. what is involved and how long it takes, the work the company does, interactive employee testimonials, FAQs.  A careers site will also play an important part in communicating the EVP to the external market.

Recruitment model – As companies grow, resource needs will increase too, so a fundamental discussion around the recruitment model should take place – is the recruitment model geared up for a growing business, is it set up for volume recruiting, are there enough recruiters, do processes need to change to reflect growth? Honest discussions on the recruitment model will help create an effective in – house team.

Final thoughts

Despite improvements in technology and the rise of social media, companies still strive to create a positive candidate experience. Persistent issues exist which need to be addressed but the focus needs to be on being proactive and hiring at a faster pace. Companies simply can’t operate at an ordinary pace but need to react faster on candidates as competition for candidates intensifies. At the Hiring Manager level, more management training should be put in place to help clearly define their roles, responsibilities and their understanding of the interview and selection process. A negative experience will turn off candidates but a positive candidate experience will serve as a formidable recruiting sergeant.

Seven things companies need to start doing if they want to win the war on talent

As skills in key industries become scarcer, here are seven things companies need to do to ensure in order to maximise their efforts in recruiting and retaining their human capital:

Website: Have a detailed, easy on the eye, uncomplicated mobile friendly website.

Candidates: Improving the candidate experience by minimising the length of time it takes to screen and review applications, speedily interviewing candidates and processing offers and taking time to acknowledge  candidates and providing appropriate and meaningful post interview feedback.

Compensation and benefits: Regularly reviewing the salary structure and benefits package by benchmarking with competitors in the same industry. Consider add – ons to offers such as issuing bonuses on early acceptance of offers, relocation allowances, support towards education.

Succession planning: The working population of the world is getting older which means that the talent pool needs to be replenished. Quality talent is spread thin, particularly in engineering so companies need to start hiring for cultural fit with a view to the long term. So when screening and interviewing, you need to be assessing whether or not the individual has growth potential.

Skills transfer: Quality candidates are finite (in engineering) so more emphasis needs to be given to considering people from other sectors where their skills can be transferable. Moreover, to hire quality people you should also consider toning down the experience requirements and consider training up those individuals to the required levels.

Employer branding: The global downturn has resulted in reduced budgets for HR and marketing in particular so that has meant less money being spent on promoting the company to the outside world. However, as economies recover and companies become cash rich again, they must invest in reinforcing the employer brand as failing to do so will have a negative impact on attracting talent. Resting on past laurels and reputation would be very naïve, and a sure fire recipe for failure.

Policies and procedures: Cut red tape, clearly define your policies and procedures and commit to following through on them if you want to hire quality hires. Anything less than this, then you will be spending a lot more time fighting fires.

Five trends that will shape talent acquisition in the years ahead

Recruiting is going to get increasingly social and mobile – with increased uptake of Smartphones and tablets, more and more candidates are going to be accessing job opportunities on the fly. This will potentially open up a new talent pool of passive job seeker.

Turnarounds are going to be the key: Hiring Managers will have to work double time to ensure that offers for potential candidates go out quickly as the escalating talent war will put pressure on hiring needs.

Quality corporate recruiters are going to be spread thin: As companies build their own dedicated in – house recruitment teams, they don’t just want individuals who are glorified salespeople but sourcing experts in their respective field who understand recruitment from a strategic perspective. According to the words of Josh Bersin, Principle and Founder, Bersin by Deloitte, “today’s recruiter must be a marketer, sales person, career coach and psychologist all in one.”

Economies rebound: As key economies such as the United States, China, India and the UK bounce back, a flood of job seekers can be expected to change jobs. This will really test the capabilities and resources of internal recruitment departments so your recruitment really needs to be geared up to deal with increased activity.

Branding: This was one of the key areas to really suffer in the global economic downturn. Companies were cutting back on advertising and fewer employees were leaving of their own accord. However, as economic fortunes improve globally, companies run the risk of being left behind and disappearing into the abyss. Resting on your laurels is not going to cut it so companies need to develop a view on employer branding.

 

 

Six reasons why you need to undertake an expat assignment in the GCC

 

Dubai is part of the United Arab Emirates and has witnessed modernisation on a grand scale since the 1990s. It has weathered the financial storms during the height of the financial crisis to re-establish itself as a prime destination for multinationals looking to establish a presence in the region and beyond. The United Arab Emirates is part of the GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) and can be best defined as a regional intergovernmental political and economic union comprising Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Having lived and worked in Dubai for nearly four years, since coming back to the UK I have benefited both culturally and career wise. My time there was interesting, enjoyable, challenging and enriching. Having also had the opportunity to travel to other countries within the GCC, I have found that there are several common themes that are prevalent throughout the six countries. These are:

The GGC leads the way in job creation: As the economies and populations of the GCC grow, so does demand on civil infrastructure, education, healthcare, housing so this results in job opportunities across multiple sectors.

Fewer decision makers: This is especially the case with regional companies/family conglomerates where it is often the CEO and/or Chairman who is the sole decision maker so decisions are reached faster rather than going through multiple layers of approval.

Faster business cycles: Due to faster decision making, projects can take shape much faster so a company’s hiring needs can be established quicker, creating job opportunities and transactions are completed faster.

Career development: Economies in the GCC are still developing so this means better prospects to move both laterally and vertically in your career. If you are somebody with between 5 and 10 years’ experience with a good educational background, you are going to be in demand so expect calls from recruiters.

Personal and professional development: Even if you decide to spend only a few years in the GCC or commit to a longer duration, you should expect to enhance your skills set as you gain exposure to prestigious projects and working alongside a multinational workforce means a more culturally diverse experience. Many expats who have worked in the GCC go on to work in other regions such as Asia Pacific and North America as their GCC experience is considered very valuable and transferable so if you choose to go to the GCC region, you will certainly be adding value to both your life and career.

Weather: Although it is stifling hot during summer months (mainly May to October), when it does cool down there are ample opportunities to pursue outdoor pursuits. Plus, it’s really nice waking up to a sunny bright blue clear skies.